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. Partners in Crime   Partners in Crime
  Susan Wittig Albert & Bill Albert
Partners in Crime MysteryPartners e-Letter  
March 31, 2008  
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MysteryPartners NewsFlash
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  • Book Report
  • Out and About
  • Herb Snips
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    Book Report
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    Susan's Podcasts Susan will be visiting five more great blogs this week: an herb farmer in Tennessee, a soap-maker in Alabama, a northern garden, and two writers' blogs. She'll be discussing a different topic on each blog. Check out the dates, places, and topics on our calendar. Be sure to bookmark it, so you can ride along with Susan. And of course, there are prizes. There's a drawing (for a first-edition copy of Nightshade) at every blog visit. Join the fun!

    Nightshade on the Shelf!
    Tomorrow's the big day. Look for Nightshade in your local bookstore. If you'd like to read the first chapter, learn more about the notorious nightshades, and bag a new recipe, go here. Hey! You can even order your very own signed copy. Book sales from Susan's website benefit the Story Circle Network.

     

    Out and About

    Susan will be touring Texas in April, talking about Nightshade. Check our Events listings to see whether she's scheduled to be in your area.


     

    Herb Snips: Sassafras: A Spring Cleansing Herb

    If your grandmother treated her family with a "spring tonic" of sassafras tea, she wasn't alone in the practice. When the colonists came to America, Native Americans shared with them their many uses of sassafras (Sassafras albidum), a handsome tree with a deeply-furrowed, oily bark that to our modern noses smells like root beer. The bark, leaves, and roots were used to treat such ailments as rheumatism, diarrhea, colds, worms, and listlessness. Modern herbalists recommend it as a mouthwash, to reduce fever, and to treat skin problems, although it is no longer used to flavor root beer.

    To make your grandmother's spring tonic, dig up a few roots of a small red sassafras tree, scrub them, and cut to fit your pot. Cover with a quart of water and simmer until the water turns red (10-20 minutes-the longer you brew, the stronger the tea). Strain, sweeten, and enjoy.

    Read more herb snips.

     

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    Nightshade
                   
    Nightshade
                   
    "The best of small-town Texas."
    Library Journal

    Click to read more or to order the book.

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    Spanish Dagger

    Spanish Dagger


    "One of her best mysteries." —Kirkus

    "A leisurely cozy with a Southwestern flair." —Publishers Weekly

    Click to read more or to order the book.

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    Take a Trip
    to the Lakes!

    The Tale of Hawthorn House


    All four of the Cottage Tales are now available from Recorded Books, narrated by acclaimed British actor/musician Virginia Leishman—a treat for the ears and the imagination! Also available: six China Bayles mysteries: Bleeding Hearts, Bloodroot, Dead Man's Bones, A Dilly of a Death, Indigo Dying, Mistletoe Man.

    To read this e-letter on our website, click here: mysterypartners.com/Newsletters/080331.html

    This newsletter is a publication of Partners in Crime, (P.O. Box 1616, Bertram TX 78605-1616). It is provided free, via e-mail, to anyone, worldwide. ©2008 Bill & Susan Albert

    Feel free to forward this newsletter to friends and colleagues with appropriate credit to Bill & Susan Albert.
    This newsletter is written and edited by Peggy Moody & Susan Wittig Albert.


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